The defense mechanism of a puffer or blowfish allows their bodies to swell into a sphere (prickly in some species) to deter predators.

Twobar Anemonefish

Although the stinging tentacles of sea anenomes are lethal to most small fish, the anemone fish develops a commensal relationship with their host anenome.

Crinoid on a sponge

This delicate crinoid finds an ideal spot to feed in the passing currents. Food particles trapped by the arms are passed along ciliated grooves to the mouth.

Whaleshark and Diver

The Rhincodon Typus or whaleshark is a slow moving filter feeding shark and the largest know extant fish species.

Djibouti Giant

This "giant" nudibranch occurs on our deep reefs at Sodwana Bay,

Pufferfish Twobar Anemonefish Crinoid on a sponge Whaleshark and Diver Djibouti Giant
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Scuba Diving with Triton Dive Lodge in Winter

Scuba Diving with Triton Dive Lodge in Winter Take a look at this gallery to see some of Sodwana Bay's secrets!  Harlequin shrimps, raggies, lion fish, leopard groupers!!!  We have been keeping a close eye on our seahorse…

Scuba Diving during 2014 with Triton Dive Lodge

Scuba Diving during 2014 with Triton Dive Lodge The diving this year so far has been amazing, we have had some awesome sightings, schooling hammerhead sharks, mantas, whalesharks, frog fish and even a juvenile seahorse (hippocampus histrix) at…

Triton Dive Lodge Photos

Triton Dive Lodge Photos

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The Coelacanth

Coelacanth Discovery by Triton Dive Charters On 28 October 2000, Pieter Venter, Peter Timm and Etienne le Roux were near the end of an eight-minute Trimix training dive ...

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Other usefull contacts

Memberships DAN Safety Partner Tel. 0860 242 242Mail. info@dansa.orgWeb. http://www.dansa.org CMAS-ISA Tel. 012 567 6229Mail. info@cmas.co.zaWeb. http://www.cmas.co.za Elephant Coast Tourism Tel. 035 562 0353Mail. info@elephantcoasttourism.comWeb. http://www.elephantcoasttourism.com South African Sustainable Seafood Initiative Tel. Not availableMail. sassi@wwf.org.zaWeb. ...

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Recommended Alternative Service Provider

Restaurants:Micro-Light Flights: Scenic introductory flights offered over the spectacular Sodwana Bay Coastline or overfly Lake Sibaya and see hippos and ...

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Sodwana Bay Malaria Information

The incidence of malaria in our area has been significantly reduced as result of multiple ongoing anti malaria campaigns. Precautions against malaria particularly between October and May are ...

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Parks and Game Reserves

Parks and Game Reserves Tembe Elephant Park Tembe Elephant park is a big five park and is home to 150 elephants in seven breeding herds.  The gate times in ...

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Sodwana Bay Info

Sodwana Bay The Agulhas current brings warm clear water to the east coast of South Africa where corals have colonised submerged fossil dunes and rocky platforms in a ...

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Finding Hope, Written by Judy Mann
Friday, 31 October 2014 10:33    | Written by Administrator    PDF Print E-mail

SAAMBR’s work on rock lobsters is helping us to ensure that they are sustainably utilised.  To ensure that future generations can benefit from harvesting these delicacies.The latest Living Planet Report produced by WWF International in collaboration with the Zoological Society of London, the Water Footprint Network and the Global Footprint Network makes sobering reading. The number of wild mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish on our planet has fallen by half over the last 40 years. This means that the state of the world’s biodiversity is worse than ever.  There is simply less space for wild animals to live as habitat loss and degradation continue. In addition to this, animals are killed at a rate faster than they can reproduce as exploitation through hunting and fishing increases. Climate change is the third most common threat to biodiversity and this threat is likely to increase pressure on populations in the future.  The Report states that the biomass of marine species declined by 39% between 1970 and 2010. The animals most affected are turtles, many shark species, and large migratory birds such as the albatross, as well as large fish species such as the tunas.

Read more... [Finding Hope, Written by Judy Mann]
Mysterious marine marvels of intertidal rockpools of Sodwana
Sunday, 15 November 2009 20:32    | Written by Administrator    PDF Print E-mail

Many a visitor to Sodwana has experienced the thrills of snorkelling with whale sharks, diving with dolphins and sighting manta rays on the move. But what about the fascinating worldopisthobranch of rock pools? Few have taken the time to explore the many hidden alcoves both above and below the water surface.

After a quick first glance it may appear that there is nothing unusually special about these pools; but after a closer look, creatures such as mantis shrimps, colourful sea anemones, sea squirts and sea slugs abound.

Read more... [Mysterious marine marvels of intertidal rockpools of Sodwana] Last Updated ( Monday, 04 February 2013 08:20 )
Launch of new sea science and species mapping project makes a splash
Thursday, 27 March 2014 13:26    | Written by Eve    PDF Print E-mail

Cape Town, 18 March 2014.

Marine biologists, students, citizen scientists and marine decision makers have joined forces in a new collaboration to unlock marine biodiversity knowledge and opportunities in South Africa. The SeaKeys project aims to collect and distribute genetic, species and ecosystem information to support wise decision making in the marine environment. This information is vital as expanding marine activities such as seabed mining, oil and gas activities and alternative energy initiatives compete for space with established fisheries and recreational use of the country's seas. Core to the project are several new marine citizen science projects that invite contributions from the public. by Dr Kerry Sink

Read more... [Launch of new sea science and species mapping project makes a splash] Last Updated ( Wednesday, 09 April 2014 10:23 )
Diving into the Watery Realm of Clownfish
Monday, 19 March 2012 10:00    | Written by Administrator    PDF Print E-mail

Juvenile AnenomefishDivers and snorkelers alike may have had the opportunity to view anemonefish, also affectionately known as clownfish, in their natural habitat; but how many fully understand the complex association between these fish and their anemone homes? An astonishing symbiotic relationship exists between these two organisms, enabling the fish to enjoy a safe home, while the anemone is protected from predators and cleaned of parasites. These parasites, which live off the tissues of the anemone, as well as leftovers from the anemone’s dinner, provide food for the fish and enable the fish to stay close to home rather than having to venture into the dark and dangerous open ocean for food.  This relationship is described as mutualistic since both anemone and fish benefit. A pretty neat setup if you ask me!

Read more... [Diving into the Watery Realm of Clownfish] Last Updated ( Tuesday, 20 March 2012 12:36 )
In Search of the Tanzanian Coelacanth – By Eve Marshall
Thursday, 14 August 2014 10:06    | Written by Eve    PDF Print E-mail

It’s no easy feat to get 6 trimix divers from SA, England and the USA plus a film crew, enough kit and cylinders for 2 rebreathers and 4 open circuit divers, plus enough helium and oxygen to spend two weeks diving trimix off of the coast of Tanga in Tanzania.  Our expeditions purpose in 2012 was to search for and film the Tanzanian Coelacanth population for SA’s film production company “Earth Touch” they were making a documentary for National Geographic to be called "Dinofish".  We had filmed the first part in Sodwana Bay with Dr Richard Pyle (Pyle deep stop fame) earlier in the year and had our fingers crossed for a successful expedition.

Heading the dive team was our own Peter Timm the man that would find them in the unexplored depths if anyone could, Robert Whitton – Dr Pyle’s technician and self proclaimed fish nerd from Hawaii, Dan Stevenson UK deep diving camera man, Eve Marshall, Werner Nell and Andre Willemse deep divers and back up support.

Read more... [In Search of the Tanzanian Coelacanth – By Eve Marshall] Last Updated ( Thursday, 14 August 2014 11:28 )

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Featured Galleries

Scuba Diving with Geoff Spiby at Triton Dive Lodge 2014 Gallery

Scuba Diving with Geoff Spiby at Triton Dive Lodge 2014 Gallery We had a great weekends diving with award winning photographer Geoff Spiby, his wife Lynn, Georgina Jones and friends from Capetown in February 2014. Despite challenging conditions due to a cyclone in the Mozambique channel Geoff captured some awesome images including schools of slingers, stumpnose bigeyes and snappers on the amazing 6 mile reef.  Nudibranchs gallore including a Djibuti Giant that has made bikini reef his home and the green coral tree on 9 mile reef.  We were rewarded with dolphins and a whale shark to top the weeks diving on Sodwana Bay's incredible reefs.


Diving to see the Coelacanths with Peter Timm and Triton Dive Lodge

Diving to see the Coelacanths with Peter Timm and Triton Dive Lodge The images in this gallery were all taken by Peter whilst diving to 110 metres in Jesser Canyon, Sodwana Bay, South Africa.  This is the only place in the world where you can dive to see a living coelacanth. Just a handful of divers have had the privilege to dive on Jesser Canyon and a few have been lucky enough to be rewarded with coelacanth sightings with the help of Peter Timm.  During March last year Peter diving with The Alternative Dive Group found and photographed coelacanths on a ten day expedition.  The photos were studied by Dr Kerry Sink…


Scuba Diving with top photographer Geoff Spiby in February with Triton Dive Lodge

Scuba Diving with top photographer Geoff Spiby in February with Triton Dive Lodge In February Triton had the privilege of hosting and diving with top (award winning) South African photographer Geoff Spiby,  his wife Lynne and Georgina Jones, an invertebrate expert and passionate Cape-Town based diver. Sodwana Bay really came to the party and the fantastic diving conditions that  couldn’t have been better with day after day of endless viz and zero current. The trip developed as a final component of the Reef Atlas Project led by the South African National Biodiversity Institute and much discussion was devoted to developing new initiatives that divers can contribute to.